Carl's FFR Mk4 Roadster Build

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
Contributing Member
Member
For the last two days ... I fiddled with the final placement of the windshield.

One of the most tiresome tasks in the build, the installation of the windshield is also one of the most frustrating. The bodies are definitely not symmetrical and FFR states in the instructions that the windshield frames vary depending on their vendor source. These factors combine to cause an iterative process of mounting, measuring, removing and adjusting the holes in the body to get the the windshield in place.

Ideally this is a two person job ... but in this case I had to improvise a little. I used a cargo strap with rubberized hooks to hold the windshield at the desired angle. The ratchet on the strap allowed for minor incremental changes to the angle of the windshield to the body.



On Friday before starting this process, Craig and I watched the Build School video on the process of installing the windshield posts on to the frame around the windshield. The chrome plated brass screws into the brass plate in the windshield frame was the delicate part; too much torque and the brass just strips out. So far so good; but some filing of the screws to get the posts completely secured to the windshield and prevent them from cracking the glass.

I am also checking with Whitby Motors to get their SS replacements for the brass plates in the windshield. Using their steel plates with SS screws from MC will reduce the chances of striping the screws. The screw part is JIS 18-8 Stainless Steel Phillips Flat Head Screws, M5 x 0.8 mm Thread, 8 mm Long, packs of 10. I called them yesterday and they are sending me the inserts and the screws ...

There are several constraints or parameters from all those that have done this before me:

1. Requirements for installation of the FFR Premium soft top ... the distance from the top screw on the frame to the rear of the door needed to be 27" (Note: I have also seen where the final angle between the windshield posts and the cowl should be 53 deg ...

2. The body should not (meaning shall not) touch the windshield metal ... meaning only the rubber seal should touch the cowl and the windshield posts SHOULD NOT touch the body where they penetrate to the frame; and,

3. Don't stress the glass by putting pressure on it from the installation of the posts ... use shims and or gently twist the brass posts so that they fit on the frame without imparting any pressure on the frame/glass. The ends of the posts tend to duck feet out as you look forward; not always matching up with the frame.

Here are the results so far ... PS



Even this is not necessarily the final position since there is a little leeway in the mounting ... the frame has 1/2" openings and the windshield is drilled for 3/8" bolts. Therefore it seemed to me the best thing was to get the hole locations on the posts marked such that there was sufficient room for the holes ... For example here is a poor photo of the problem I initially had on the PS post.



It is a hard to see but the left or bottom hole would only be incomplete going through the back of the windshield post.

DS



For me the most useful parameters seemed to be the distance from the hood edge to the rubber on the windshield and the distance from the top screw of the post to the rear of the door body side. I am worried that the distance from the first top screw to the back of the door is different by about 1/4".

As part of the iterative process of fitting the windshield I did goon up the DS holes in the body ...



The inside of the body is almost touching the post so I will need to expand it a little while filling in the outside ... A LOT!

I have not actually pulled the windshield to drill the holes in the posts yet so if I am doing something way wrong please comment. The goal is to get the windshield finished on Wednesday.
 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
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Member
After about 5 hours of futzing with the variables ... and there are many we (mostly Craig) finally got the windshield installed.

Some highlights ... or low lights of the installation:

1. We had to expand the holes in the body considerably to get the right alignment of the windshield posts and get close to the proper alignment for the premium top ... We had to move them back to get proper alignment on the holes in the frame. I will have a little fiberglass work to close up the holes (or uses bigger pieces of aluminum).

2. With the exception of one nut on the upper bolt of the windshield post we used regular versus lock nuts (during the final install I will use some Locktite on these nuts).

3. At Craig's recommendation we made and installed thin plastic washers on the small chromed brass nuts that attach the windshield posts to the brass part on the side of the windshield. This allowed us to get the posts tight without filing off the screws. NOTE: I have ordered the SS inserts from Whitby for future installation ...

4. After test fitting the windshield we had to bend the lower part of the post slightly to make them parallel with the plate on the frame.

5. Last but not least we had to install shims between the posts and the frames. At the suggestion of EdwardB on the other forum, I purchased 1/8", 1/16" and 1/32" body shims to substitute for the washers ... making installation much easier.

Each installation will vary but we ended up with the following shim installation:

DS Upper 1/16" + 1/32"
DS Lower 1/8"

PS Upper 2 x 1/16"
PS Lower 1/8" +1/16"

Here is a photo of the type of shim used ... I purchased them at NAPA.



Here is the semi final installation of the windshield ...



Thanks to Craig for getting the Olde Goat's roadster to this next level.

Carl
 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
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I have been pushing forward to get the items done so I can get the car ready for photos.

The lights have all been installed ...

Headlights were a bit more of PIA than I expected ... and the manual doesn't help a lot. Specifically:

1. I had to expand the hole in the plastic bucket for the wiring and use larger grommets ... my fat fingers just couldn't make the much smaller grommet work;

2. When attaching the bucket to the body the manual shows using only one screw (although the photos seemed to show more than one). I ended up using 4 of the 5 supplied;



3. The clip provided to keep the exterior ring or cap steady was easier to put on before installing the bucket;



4. I had previously modified the clips that hold the ring to the light as done by others before me. Before I install the lights for the final time ... I will use longer screws and some locktite to make sure they don't vibrate off;



It is starting to look like a real car now ...



The Rear lights ... pretty much as expected although I clocked them 90 deg so the lettering on the lenses is right side up. The rear lights are a pain to get tightened down ... You have to install the washers and nuts from under the car. I did remove the rear wheels to make it easier. If I can get away with it I will reinstall after painting before installing the body.

 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
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Member
Here are the photos of the doors after a lot of work on the gaps and the intersections between the door tops and the body.

Passenger Side:



There must be a wide enough gap so that no part of the door touches the body when opening and closing ... also taking into account the thickness of the paint on both parts.



Driver Side:





Carl
 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
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Member
Here is a video update after mocking up most of the components on the body ... so I can take photos today to send to DMV and get this thing road legal ...

 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
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After almost a month I finally got back on the build ... feels great. After the infected part of my right lung was removed I feel a whole lot better; ready to get re done now.

Thanks to EdwardB over on the Factory Five Forum for these modifications/improvements.

I had initially installed the windshield wiper wheel boxes on the cowl using the hardware provided by FFR including the rubber hose gasket that goes between the wheel box and the body cowl. The one on the left on the photo.



I also had to make some "adjustments" to one of the wheel boxes



As others have found ... these just don't do the job adequately. EdwardB's method of substituting 3/4" aluminum square tube for the rubber seemed to be my best option. Initially I cut the tube to match the angle in the rubber gasket; which turned out to be the wrong thing to do. The original cut is to the right in the above photo.

After attempting to reassemble the wheelbox with the newly fabricated gasket, I found that the angle of the cut taken from the rubber gasket was way off compared to the angle on the chrome base.



After grinding the 3/4" to the correct angle ... here is how all the parts fit together. The red rectangle represents the fiberglass cowl.





After installation the only issue appears to be the gaskets under the chrome base. I could not get them positioned so the gasket was centered under the base on the windshield side.



I must be doing something wrong in the assembly or I need to make larger gaskets ... Thoughts?

A word of caution; it is very easy to get the ferrule nut cross threaded on the aluminum "snout" of the wheel box. That end of the wheel box is aluminum and very easy to cross thread (at least for this Defective End User).

Another EdwardB modification is bending the arms of the windshield wipers so the blades are lower on and parallel to the bottom of the windshield when in the "park" position.



Before bending they stick up about 30 degrees from horizontal. The DS could be bent as is but a propane torch was used to heat up the PS to the proper bend without distortion or, even worse, breaking. I think this looks a lot better.

 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
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Member
Mike,

Actually I did not ... I went by what some other Mk4 builders did on theirs ... plus I didn't think about it until I had already bent the DS.

The good news (or silver lining in the cloud) is that the bend on the DS was very minor so the sweep should not be impacted much. The PS was bent a lot so I could definitely have a problem on that side.

Thanks for the reminder though ... it's on the punch list!
 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
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Member
As background ... I had a challenge where 1) the hardware provide by FFR was 7/16"-14 while the FinishLine Overiders were designed for 3/8"-16 hardware; 2) I had already installed the FFR hardware on the rear and the tank was already installed; and 1/2 full of gas; 3) I wanted to make sure the front overriders were installed parallel to the face of the radiator opening; and, 4) my first solution looked like crap.

Thanks to Craig S and King over on the FFR forums here is the resulting solution

Front Overriders:

Here is the final hardware for mounting to the front frame.



The only real PIA is getting to the heads of the bolts inside the overriders but a claw foot open end wrench solved that problem.

This is how the King 7/16" to 3/8" brackets were attached to the overriders.



For the front overriders ONLY ... the brackets were heated and bent to approximate about 7 deg from vertical. To achieve the desired angle I cut the upper FinishLine SS sleeve to get the distance I thought look right from the face of the radiator opening to the back of the overrider. The lower FinishLine SS sleeve was then sized to achieve the angle.



Here are the results ...





My thanks to CraigS and King ... King thanks for making the excellent brackets.

Thoughts ...

Rear Overriders in the Next Post ...
 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
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The installation of the rear FinishLine Overriders was easier than the front ones ...

I had already installed the Kleiner modification to allow installing the hardware without lowering the gas tank. Here is the hardware for the rear.



The results ....





Do you think this will work long term?
 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
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Member
Now that the body was in position I cut the holes for the Breeze Driver's Side SS Roll Bar.

Why Breeze vice the one that comes from FFR? The FFR hoops are "too" tall and are not raked back in my humble opinion; the Breeze looks a lot better.

Since I didn't have the holes cut by FFR prior to delivery I had to do it myself...and the process was just a little crazy.

The light from a strong flashlight can be seen through the fiberglass so I inserted a light into the frame mounts for the roll bar and used felt tipped pen to mark the spot for the hole on the fiberglass. A 2" diameter hole saw was used to cut the first hole.



Once the inside leg was located the outer leg hole was marked at the base of the outside leg of the Breeze hoop parallel to the flat section of the rear cowl.

Again used the 2" holes saw to cut the hole for the outside leg of the hoop and then the hoop lowered on to the frame tubes.



Now for the trickier part ... locating and cutting the oval for the rear leg of the roll bar. Broke out the trusty flashlight again ...



I focused the flashlight to maximize the beam and marked the location with the marker. The cut was made with the 2" hole saw and then ovaled out with a grinding wheel and rasp.



After fiddling with the moving parts here is the semi-final fitment of the roll bar. The final fitment will have to wait until the body is off for painting to get access for mounting and drilling the stub tubes.





Once I had in position I marked the tube in the locations where it emerges from the body to make off body fitting easier.



Any suggestions or comments are always appreciated!
 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
Contributing Member
Member
After going as far as I could with the wiring of the trunk I decided to focus on getting the rest of the heater vent tubes mocked up.

The heater box and all engine compartment components have already been installed .... a long time ago! The vent tubes to the foot box vents are also installed. What remains are the vent tubes to the rear facing vents and the defroster/demister for the windshield.

Before installing these I needed to figure out how to connect the "Y" to the NCR fiberglass defroster plenum through the 2" blasted gate valve used to control airflow to the plenum.

Some requirements I set for the install:

1. It had to be removable without cutting the vent tube or the plenum;
2. Maximize flow to the windshield area right in front of the driver; and,
3. The amount of air going to the defroster needed to be controlled.

The solution and mock up ...

1. Determined the location for the plenum and blast gate;

2. Drilled a 2.5" hole with a hole saw in the plenum;
3. Drilled a hole to accept the boss on the 2" blast gate valve;

4. Fabricate a 1/8" thick rubber gasket to seal off the area between the blast gate and the bottom of the plenum;
5. Fabricate 3 brackets from sheet metal to attach the blast gate to the plenum;

6. Drill out the brackets to use the existing hardware on the blast gate and #10-24 machine screws and Nyloc nuts for the plenum;

7. Installed the assembled blast gate on the plenum making sure the that the boss on the blast gate is indexed to the small hole on the plenum;
8. A PVC "T" was painted and prepped to divert air to the defroster plenum;
9. The vent tubes are then attached to the "T".
 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
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Member
The FinishLine Trunk Prop Rod is mocked up ... finally.

Borrowing on the work of others on the forum ... with a few modifications of my own. The biggest modification was to move the rod farther away from the trunk lip and mount the bottom bracket so that it would not interfere with the Breeze "D" trunk seal.

Using some scrap 1.5" x 1.5" x 1/8" angle aluminum bracket was fabricated to accept the rod's bracket on the inboard side, mount to the trunk lip and provide a location for the brace to the side of the trunk.

A brace was fashioned from some spare 1/2" aluminum tubing. The ends were flattened out and drilled for #10 - 24 x 1/2" bolt on the top and 3/16" rivet on the bottom.

The base of the upper support is a 1" x 2.5" x 1/4" aluminum block shaped to fit along side the "rib" on the trunk lid. Two #10-24 3/4" countersunk screws will be installed on the back (or top) of the block before it's secured to the lid with HSRF.

All the other hardware used are SS #10-24 1/2" bolts, Nyloc nuts and SS washers.



After getting all the mounting hardware together I needed to position the lower and upper mounts so the Prop Rod would fully open the lid and clear the Breeze seal installed on the trunk lip.

The final position of the REAR of the mounts was 7" from the trunk edge on the body and 16 3/4" on the lid. After several tries I finally came to the realization that the darn thing could be in multiple possible positions as long as, with the trunk lid closed, no interference occurred with the body and the lid. The closer to the front; the higher the lid will open limited by the hinges. For this Prop Rod you do need to raise the trunk lid slightly to release the latch on the rod.



The lower end of the Prop Rod is attached to bracket that is mounted on the edge or lip of the trunk and supported by a brace attached to the side of the inner trunk wall.



The upper end is attached to a block "glued" to the trunk lid just inside the "rib".



The HSRF will be done after the body is removed for painting and the final installation after the final body installation.

Is this the right approach ...?

Carl
 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
Contributing Member
Member
Over the weekend I completed the mock up of all the fittings that go on the trunk lid:

Trunk License Plate Access Cover:

The kit does not come with a cover for the access hole for the license plate light so I made a template from a file folder and cut out the cover from left over aluminum. This photo is after drilling the holes and grinding out for the trunk light switch.



The cover was roughly cut and then trimmed, ground and sanded to fit in the recess of the access. With the help of a little heat the aluminum was bent to the curvature of the opening.



Trunk Light:

The light is designed to be recessed into the aluminum so a hole was cut out and four holes drilled to support the light. Because I wanted to be able to shut the light off with the trunk open a toggle switch was added to the circuit and mounted between the light and the handle.



In hindsight I wish I had looked a little harder to find a round light which would have looked better; this one does put plenty of light out.



The light is controlled via a mercury type tilt switch which provides an input to the InfinityBox system. The power comes from the rear POWERCELL mounted in the trunk. Power and grounds for the lights are routed through a 3 pin weather pack which allows the trunk to be removed with all wiring installed (that is after its painted and reassembled).

 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
Contributing Member
Member
The last few weeks have been focused on getting ready for painting ....

Essentially I am converting the three car garage into a large paint booth so that I can paint the body, doors, hood and trunk lid. One of the fellows srobinsonx2 over on the Factory Five Forum has just completed painting his roadster and has done an excellent job documenting the entire process including documenting the advice of two of the premier painters ... Jeff Miller and Jeff Kleiner ... or Jeffs Squared!. I have made a few modifications ... but not many ... to their recommendations.

I have also started gathering all the consumables for the paint job ...

Body Buck: The original dolly was modified ... extended to 96" and the casters replaced with lockable wheels. The forms that support the body at both ends were fabricated and a "reverse" version cut. This was all driven by my experience earlier in the build trying to work on the underside of the body ... it was unstable on the older version of the dolly.



After completeing the work on the underside of the body ends or forms (I obviously don't know what to call them) will be removed and the traditional FFR versions will be installed so the body can be mounted right side up.



I understand that I can trim off part ends of these to allow easier access when painting ....

Jeffs Squared both recommend (which means I shall) that the body, hood, doors and trunk lid be painted in the same orientation they fit on the frame. Jeff Kleiner provided information on the fixtures he used to achieve that goal without having to use the frame.

Doors: The fixture is fabricated to allow the doors to be suppprted by the top two hinge bolts and gives access to both sides of the door for painting. My modifications included: 1. Using 3/8"-16 Hardware to install the casters and the upright to the base (allows me to take it apart for storage and transport (BTW the bolts on the door are 3/8"-16 so all the gphardware is common); and, 2. Lockable wheel casters where installed to make the thing easier pro move around.







The hood and trunk lid are set up pretty much the same. They are both designed so you can flip ypthe over to paint the underside of the two parts. A couple of things I learned the hard way ... 1. make sure the front base is wide enough; and, 2. The legs tall enough to allow the parts to be rotated.

The bases were constructed with some rough scrap lumber ... 2"x 4" for the base and 1"x 4" for the legs. The rods were tubes I had around the shop or porch asked dowl from the local HW store. The eye bolts were 1/4"-20 5".1/4" - 20 all thread was used for other supports as well as one section of 3/8"-16 all thread for the rear of the hood.

Hood: The only additional materials for the hood was two small pieces of 3/4" square tube drilled for the 1/4" on the short side and for two 3/16" rivets on the longer side.



Trunk Lid: The rear base was mounted through the license plate hole and bent to provide vertices support.



Per one of the Jeffs Squared ... I covered the table and base with a painter's drape (the baby blue stuff in the photo).that has plastic on one side and absorbable material on the other ... with the latter on the side up. If the plastic side is up the paint that dries on the surface can flake off and become airborne during subsequent spraying.

The next step is rearranging the garage so that I can have plenty of room to get around the parts and can cmplete each coat without having to move them around.

Again ... the best first time painters thread I have seen so far on these forums is srobinsonx2 on the other forum. Thanks to him, Jeff M. and Jeff K.

Carl
 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
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As is all things I seem to start these days ... the installation of my "new good deal" air compressor took a lot longer than planned.

Well the installation is almost complete ... unless you guys find something I missed causing me to make some changes and a few other fixes.

A couple of objectives in the installation:

1) Maximize Sweat Equity and Minimize Material Costs ... for I am a cheap bastard;
2) Maximize CFM within the constraints of Objective 1 below to support High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) spray guns; and,
3) Get Air that is acceptably dry and clean out of the system for painting.

This led to the following choices:

1) Iron pipe for the piping;
2) 3/4" ID pipe size through the manifold and 3/8" ID fittings to maximize volumetric flow for HVLP painting;
3) 3/8" ID pipe size through the manifold and 1/4" ID fittings for the other uses;
4) Sourcing materials from the local hardware stores where possible including the particulate/mist filter for the tool manifold;
5) Using a loop in the piping to allow cooling and condensation of water from the air which if need be can be cooled with ice or dry ice (a tray will be added later if this is needed); and,
6) A drain to remove condensation from the tank and piping without having to depressurize the tank.

Here are the results:



The upper manifold is the 3/4" setup for HLVP painting (although it can be used for tools as well). The lower manifold is for other tools. Either one can be isolated for maintenance, etc.

The difference between 3/8" and 1/4" ID is evident in the following photo:



I can source more efficient fittings if I find that the volumetric flow rate is too low.

The horizontal part of the loop is sloped slightly to allow condensation to drain to the valve on the bottom of the right vertical leg.



A 30 amp plug and receptacle was installed for the air compressor so that the outlet could also be used with my MIG welder.

The air compressor is mounted to the floor via concrete anchors and cushioned with a steel plate and rubber pads made by Kobalt for the compressor.



The drain, shown on the lower left side of the tank, has 2 valves in series that allow the tank to be isolated when draining condensation from the tank. The outer valve is shut; the inner valve is opened; condensation drains into the piping between the valves; the inner valve shut; and, then the outer valve is open to drain out the condensation.

The system was pressure checked ... which of course did not go without incident...

First I could not get the compressor to run very fast ... turns out I wired the plug for 120 volts instead of the required 240 volts

Second I had changed the oil on the compressor ... and I forgot to install the fill plug. This became obvious when I found oil spots all over my freshly painting piping, the wall and floor.

The good news: No Leaks

Any issues to be concerned about here?

Carl
 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
Contributing Member
Member
Background: After a whole lot of personal research and increase state of confusion on my part, The Jeff's Squared (Jeff Kleiner and Jeff Miller) suggested taking a look at the 3M ACCUSPRAY Spray Gun System. After studying both the 3M website and viewing multiple YouTube videos, I took the plunge and purchased the system.

3M advertises the system as ...

"The one of the only HVLP spray gun system that allows for professional-grade solvent-based or waterborne finish application with virtually no cleaning and no maintenance kits.

This system features a lightweight, composite spray gun body that is molded in one piece, eliminating the complexity, wear and cleaning of small parts and pieces.

It effortlessly accepts replaceable atomizing heads ? these transparent nozzles can be reused 5-10 times and then simply removed and replaced. This affords the performance of a brand new spray gun, on demand and at a fraction of the price.

Atomizing heads are available in a 1.4 mm size, ideal for sealers, primer surfacers, basecoats and topcoats; a 1.8 mm size for higher-viscosity materials such as primer and gel coats; and a 2.0 mm size for heavy-duty applications using fluids like adhesives, undercoats or industrial coatings. And fast, easy controls for fan diameter, fluid and air pressure allow for quick adjustment across jobs from spot repairs to full panel coverage requiring up to 12? vertical or horizontal spray patterns ? one gun for a complete range of applications."

The system requires 20 psig and 13 CFM at the gun.

So here is what I have purchased so far from Amazon:



ACCUSPRAY Spray Gun System with Standard PPS (#16580) which contains almost all you would need to spray the car. In addition to the composite gun the kit includes 1.2, 1.3, 1.4 and 1.8 mm atomizing heads, an air control valve with pressure gage, 5 soft liners and lids with built in filters, 1 Standard 650 ml/22 fl. Oz. hardcup with mixing/measuring insert.

3M PPS Starter Kit: Standard Size (#16172) contains six 650ml/22 fl. oz. cups and lids, collar, mix ratio insert and a bag of sealing plugs.







3M ACCUSPRAY 2 mm Atomizing Head (#16609) contains (5) 2 mm heads for use with high build type primers (like SlickSand). The other sized atomizing heads are the same basic configuration except they are translucent to make for easier cleaning.



Now that I have seen the kit I need to purchase 3M PPS Large Kit with 200 micron filters (#16024) which contains 25 of the disposable soft cubs and lids.
 

Scott Harrison

"Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional"
Staff member
Contributing Member
Member
Not sure I would use Iron pipe. You'll be getting even more rusty water than you'll get from the just the tank. I used schedule 80 PVC on my first compressor. This is rated at 400-500 psi operating pressure, and burst pressure over 2000 psi, but considered a no no for air compressor applications....but after 18 years, it hasn't leaked or exploded yet.

Rapid air systems http://www.rapidairproducts.com/ were introduced later, and I used them on the second compressor in the outer garage. Expensive but easy to install.

Also check with people who paint cars. I suspect you'll need a bigger dryer if your cooling system doesn't get it dry enough. http://www.eastwood.com/dvb-qc3-air-filter-and-dryer.html

Also, see how often you need to drain the tank. In the summer with high humidity, you may get a pint of water after only an hour or two.


As is all things I seem to start these days ... the installation of my "new good deal" air compressor took a lot longer than planned.

Well the installation is almost complete ... unless you guys find something I missed causing me to make some changes and a few other fixes.

A couple of objectives in the installation:

1) Maximize Sweat Equity and Minimize Material Costs ... for I am a cheap bastard;
2) Maximize CFM within the constraints of Objective 1 below to support High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) spray guns; and,
3) Get Air that is acceptably dry and clean out of the system for painting.

This led to the following choices:

1) Iron pipe for the piping;
2) 3/4" ID pipe size through the manifold and 3/8" ID fittings to maximize volumetric flow for HVLP painting;
3) 3/8" ID pipe size through the manifold and 1/4" ID fittings for the other uses;
4) Sourcing materials from the local hardware stores where possible including the particulate/mist filter for the tool manifold;
5) Using a loop in the piping to allow cooling and condensation of water from the air which if need be can be cooled with ice or dry ice (a tray will be added later if this is needed); and,
6) A drain to remove condensation from the tank and piping without having to depressurize the tank.



The upper manifold is the 3/4" setup for HLVP painting (although it can be used for tools as well). The lower manifold is for other tools. Either one can be isolated for maintenance, etc.

The difference between 3/8" and 1/4" ID is evident in the following photo:



I can source more efficient fittings if I find that the volumetric flow rate is too low.

The horizontal part of the loop is sloped slightly to allow condensation to drain to the valve on the bottom of the right vertical leg.



A 30 amp plug and receptacle was installed for the air compressor so that the outlet could also be used with my MIG welder.

The air compressor is mounted to the floor via concrete anchors and cushioned with a steel plate and rubber pads made by Kobalt for the compressor.



The drain, shown on the lower left side of the tank, has 2 valves in series that allow the tank to be isolated when draining condensation from the tank. The outer valve is shut; the inner valve is opened; condensation drains into the piping between the valves; the inner valve shut; and, then the outer valve is open to drain out the condensation.

The system was pressure checked ... which of course did not go without incident...

First I could not get the compressor to run very fast ... turns out I wired the plug for 120 volts instead of the required 240 volts

Second I had changed the oil on the compressor ... and I forgot to install the fill plug. This became obvious when I found oil spots all over my freshly painting piping, the wall and floor.

The good news: No Leaks

Any issues to be concerned about here?

Carl
 

Carlewms

The Rivet Man
Contributing Member
Member
Scott,

Thanks for the feedback ... BTW I looked at the Rapid Air system and really would have preferred it but it did seem to be in the numbers right now for my small installation.

I had not thought to much about the inside rust issue ... Ok I had not thought of it at all :mad:. I will have to watch the filters carefully.

The humidity issue is still a concern. Some have suggested adding a small inline filter right before the gun; others have suggested using a desiccant snake. if they both work they would give me a cheaper way to remove the last bit of humidity in the line before the gun.

Have you used any of these?

Again, thanks.

 
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