Garage Size

Doug Smith

Contributing Member
Member
#22
Yup. I've planned for workbenches, etc. They should all fit in 36x36 with the cars and lift. Already have the racing fridge which keeps all of my garage beverages nice and cold. I'm not going to know where it goes until I figure out the area of the garage where I spend the most time. Of course, that might not work because I think where I spend the most time is near the fridge. :elder:Hmmmmm...
 

InProcess

Ken Caniglia AKA Superfly
Contributing Member
Member
#23
20180330_141657_005.jpg You need to check the clearance for a work bench if your going to have two cars end to end. Below is picture showing doors on my 36 ft wide garage. Three 9 ft wide doors with side door for entry. Structurally not really enough room for 3 ft front entry door using hurricane standards.
 

SchmidtAl

Contributing Member
Member
#25
Consider a work garage, heated and air conditioned, with benches on 3 sides, outlets and air every 4 feet. Then unheated garage beside it with connecting door. Also separate area for lawn mower, snow blower etc, all within one building.
 

Eric Nelson

Contributing Member
Member
#26
Consider a work garage, heated and air conditioned, with benches on 3 sides, outlets and air every 4 feet. Then unheated garage beside it with connecting door. Also separate area for lawn mower, snow blower etc, all within one building.
Concur. And, if I had it to do again, I would use radiant floor heating.
 

Scott Harrison

"Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional"
Staff member
Contributing Member
Member
#28
If you're putting in lifts, I don't recommend radiant floor heating unless you know exactly where the floor pad bolts will be located.

Also, Al is correct about the electrical outlets at 4' intervals. And they should be at 4' off the floor rather than the traditional ~16". And the circuits should be wired for 20 amps vs 15.

Don't forget 220v outlets for compressor, and welders. I also suggest putting 220v outlets in ceiling for lifts.

ceiling outlet.jpg

wall outlets.jpg
 
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#29
Whatever you build, it will not be enough. I have radiant heat and A/c in my 26X30 and it is very nice to go in there in the winter and fall asleep on the floor.
 

Doug Smith

Contributing Member
Member
#30
Yup. I had the 220v outlets planned. Hadn't thought about them in the ceiling for the lift. Good call on 4' outlet intervals. Will make sure I plan for that too.
 

Tom Wells

Contributing Member
Member
#31
Doug,

Just recalled "one more thing:"

A friend put some 8' fluorescent lights about four feet up the wall around his lift so he could see better under the car when it was elevated.

The newer LED tubes would be more resistant to abuse than the old fluorescents.

If you get the LEDs, I prefer the ones with the diffuser vs the clear ones where you can plainly see the individual LEDs.

There are clear plastic tubes available that slip over the glass to add protection for the fluorescents, but I don't think you'd need them for the LEDs; they usually come inside plastic tubes - no glass.

Buy the maximum lumens!

Gawd this is fun spending someone else's money...

Tom
 

Scott Harrison

"Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional"
Staff member
Contributing Member
Member
#32
Doug, Why don't you and Herb stop by and we can go thru garage ideas and things I would do differently.
 

Eric Nelson

Contributing Member
Member
#33
Doug,

Just recalled "one more thing:"

A friend put some 8' fluorescent lights about four feet up the wall around his lift so he could see better under the car when it was elevated.

The newer LED tubes would be more resistant to abuse than the old fluorescents.

If you get the LEDs, I prefer the ones with the diffuser vs the clear ones where you can plainly see the individual LEDs.

There are clear plastic tubes available that slip over the glass to add protection for the fluorescents, but I don't think you'd need them for the LEDs; they usually come inside plastic tubes - no glass.

Buy the maximum lumens!

Gawd this is fun spending someone else's money...

Tom
Next time, I will put lights in the floor under mine. They need to be waterproof and strong enough to occasionally drive on (outdoor landscape/sidewalk lights), so they're a little pricey.
 

InProcess

Ken Caniglia AKA Superfly
Contributing Member
Member
#34
Is Doug building a garage or a villa? What happened to the sauna, bar, large screen tv and bathroom :idiot2:

4ft is normally over work benches, not needed for entire garage. Another good idea (but not required) is to have every other outlet on different circuits so that outlets over a work bench are not on the same circuit, assuming you are going to use both at the same time. Some of us don't have infinite wealth so needs, vice desirements are all we can afford. :popcorn:
 
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#35
Next time, I will put lights in the floor under mine. They need to be waterproof and strong enough to occasionally drive on (outdoor landscape/sidewalk lights), so they're a little pricey.
My buddy just did this on his garage. He put 3 lights in the floor directly under the lift. 2 up front and 1 in the rear. Should work out nicely.
 

Eric Nelson

Contributing Member
Member
#36
Is Doug building a garage or a villa? What happened to the sauna, bar, large screen tv and bathroom :idiot2:

4ft is normally over work benches, not needed for entire garage. Another good idea (but not required) is to have every other outlet on different circuits so that outlets over a work bench are not on the same circuit, assuming you are going to use both at the same time. Some of us don't have infinite wealth so needs, vice desirements are all we can afford. :popcorn:
It doesn't cause extra to put outlets high rather than low. You need to assume things will be moved around in the garage, stuff piled up against the wall, benches added or moved, etc. Good idea about alternating circuits for the outlets. And putting in lots of (cheap) outlets in up front obviates the need to put them in later or restrict where you use tools in the future. Again - it's the stingy man who spends the most, so, put in all your "desirements" up front, 'cause they are all very cheap then, especially compared with trying to add them later, or dealing with a lifetime of "I wish I had put in xxxx and yyyy." Many things, e.g., lights in the floor, are essentially impossible to add later.
And, I am at least as "poor" as anyone here (much more so than ANY of the ones who has a pure toy car(s) costing many tens of thousands of dollars!!!).
 

jim

Contributing Member
Member
#37
I would take Scott up on his offer He was a big help in my planning. I would also suggest security cameras I have four in my garage. Two outdoors, and two indoors
 

InProcess

Ken Caniglia AKA Superfly
Contributing Member
Member
#38
My comment on 4 ft referred to seperation, not height. And no one said don't build it right the first time. Again the question is what are you going to use the garage for and what design characteristics do you need to achieve your goal.
 

Eric Nelson

Contributing Member
Member
#39
My comment on 4 ft referred to seperation, not height. And no one said don't build it right the first time. Again the question is what are you going to use the garage for and what design characteristics do you need to achieve your goal.
I have put in outlets every six feet or so, in my garage, alternating duplex 120s and single 240s, with a few extra 120s in what I thought were strategic areas, e.g., over workbenches. I quickly realized that I needed at least 50% more 120s.
 
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